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20130201
20130228
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KRCB (PBS) 16
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo- haris, who offers a complex portrait of the woman best known for refusing to give up her seat on an alabama bus in 1955. >> she is celebrated for one act and i think part of that celebration puts it all in the past, right, when the actual rosa parks keeps working on racial and social justice issues all the way up t
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy
, the state of play in florida, which has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the u.s. >> nothing really truly equalizes a smal petite woman with someone who's 6'3, 230 pounds who's angry except a firearm. >> those weapons often times fall in the hands of bad folks in our communities. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan brings together high school students from across the country to talk about guns and violence. >> woodruff: and as oscar night nears, tony scott, movie critic for the "new york times," gives us his take on the latest buzz about wild cards and front runners. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fro
agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. just go online to pbskidsgo.org. we have behind-the-scenes, entire episodes, and loads of brand-new games all the time. but don't just take my word for it, go, check it out for yourself. play your harmonica like you mean it! this is going to go on a long time! and i'm not sorry to do it! i love that thing! i like your hat! i like your shoes! (laughter) captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening, everyone. i'm susie gharib. whether it's time or money, philanthropy or helping others, it's an investment, and americans gave more than $350 billion to charity last year. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. from everyday americans to the nation's richest people and companies, we look at what influences giving. >> susie: and we head to chicago to learn about social impact bonds funding non-profits and letting american investors change the world with their decisions. >> tom: that and more tonight on a special edition here of "n.b.r." >> susie: with the financi
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and atchoishey pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i s
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown everfour months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense propo
and capital income. and the u.s. is a relatively high capital income taoury. we have about the highest corporate tax on earth. i think guiana and the congo have higher rates. other than that, nobody does. so if we try to drive up the amount of revenue we extract from capital the capital flees and there are no jobs in the u.s. so we have to have a more 21st century appreciation for how economies really work. and if we want to create high-paying jobs for people we need to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in deces. >> cau theyre locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, the investment, the call for the investment in univers
of skilled policy advocates driving a remarkable turnaround that has already changed the u.s. political landscape. >> warming isn't, in fact, accelerating. in fact, there's been none for 15 years. >> hockenberry: there's christopher monckton, a big draw at these meetings, who brings the skeptics to their feet every time. >> god bless america. >> hockenberry: republican congressman james sensenbrenner of wisconsin, vice chairman of the use science committee. >> paul krugman accused my colleagues and me of treason against the planet. (laughter) >> hockenberry: there's chris horner from the competitive enterprise institute... >> ...economic salvation. this is our way out. >> hockenberry: and james taylor, senior flow at the heartland institute, organizer of this gathering. >> the debate indeed is over. in the years prior to 2007, the 2008 elections, we actually heard from many folks that we should tone it down on global warming, we should not talk about the issue, because the court of public opinion had already decided and we were on the losing end. but we believe that if we present the ca
decision on whether to send u.s. troops into pakistan. >> he also knew that if it had gone wrong, there would not only have been dramatically negative consequences for the men he sent in, and for our country's security, but also for his own politics. it very ll could he been a reerndindecion. >> narrator: the president decided to authorize the operation for sunday, may 1. >> i think that was one of the longest days that he's had as president. he said to us at the time that the minutes were feeling like hours, as we waited for the operation to begin. >> narrator: they waited for the signal that bin laden was in the compound. >> admiral mcraven provided the call sign "geronimo kia"-- "killed in action." and at that point, people kind of started to make eye contact and there was this sense of not just relief, but great pride and admiration in what had taken place. and nobody spoke until the president said to everybody around him, "looks like we got him." >> the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al qaeda. >> narrator: the killing of o
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)